Regarding the Ghost in the Shell casting controversy [Part 4]


So it seems the social justice warriors are screeching like autistic retards again. After a recent interview where Scarlett Johansson talked about the whitewashing controversy surrounding the movie, they collectively lost their shit again. No surprise there, though. And like clockwork, the ignorant, clueless and agenda pushing media chimed in. Including one of my “favorite” gaming websites Polygon. And I have already covered it in detail in the parts: Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3. But since these autistic retards are in an uproar once again I decided to do a quick recap. If I had some paper and brightly colored crayons I would draw them some pretty pictures as they might understand this more easily, so let’s do this thing!

Firstly and the most important issue in my mind anyway is what the country of origin thinks of casting a white actress as the role of Motoko Kusanagi. The opinion expresses in Japan (In the video above) seems totally different than what we are being told by the media and Social Justice Warriors. The majority of the Japanese people interviewed in the video don’t care if an actor is White, Asian or Black as long as the actor does a proper portrayal of the character. Fuck me right? A totally level headed opinion to have. Also, the Japanese girl around the 4:27 minute mark, hits the nail right on the head and says exactly what I have been saying all along, Hollywood needs a big actress to tie to a movie for it to bring in the money.

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Secondly, the people behind the franchise are also fine with her casting. Including Mamoru Oshii, who directed the original 1995 Ghost in the Shell film, Kenji Kamiyama, who directed both seasons of the Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex and composer Kenji Kawai, who provided the score for the Ghost in the Shell movie. Not to mention Kodansha Sam who is the president one of the biggest Anime and Manga publishers in Japan. And he had the following to say during an interview with  The Hollywood Reporter“Looking at her career so far, I think Scarlett Johansson is well cast. She has the cyberpunk feel. And we never imagined it would be a Japanese actress in the first place. This is a chance for a Japanese property to be seen around the world.” He added he was “impressed by the respect being shown for the source material.

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Then there is the source material, Masamune Shirow the manga’s creator has not even mentioned her nationality once or if she originally was male or female. Even in the series the Major’s origins, pre-prosthetic ethnicity and even real name (Motoko Kusanagi which is a pseudonym) are kept ambiguous.  The Major’s design in the original movie is based on the Japanese image of a classic American beauty. Most likely due to the popularity of western movies in Japan. Casting an American actress to play her isn’t exactly out of character. Having said all that, she is basically a brain inside a prosthetic body, so her nationality or sex does not really matter. As she has been in the body of all shapes and sizes and even that of a young child during the course of the franchise.

[Editorial Note:] The notion of whitewashing in fiction is absurd because it doesn’t exist. It’s called an adaptation, grow the fuck up and stop your autistic screeching.

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About larch

I am a cucumber in a fruit bowl.
This entry was posted in Anime/Cartoons/CGI, Movies, Rants and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Regarding the Ghost in the Shell casting controversy [Part 4]

  1. vetusan says:

    From her Wikia entry:

    “Kusanagi’s various incarnations in the manga, movies, and TV series all portray her differently. Since each of these has an independent storyline, Kusanagi’s physical and mental characteristics have been modified in different ways.”

    Also she is a freaking cyborg. Which means that she can look like a western human even if she has a japanese name.

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